Improving Your Home Value

Bathroom Tile Can Be Applied In More Than Just A Brick-Lay Pattern

Go to just about any home in your neighborhood and you are very likely to find tile applied in a brick-lay style. While this is a common option that looks well, it is not the only pattern you have to choose from. Whether you plan to upgrade the tile in your shower, bath, or the floor in your bathroom, learn more about some of the other bathroom tile styles you can choose from.

Stacked

The stacked-style pattern can be achieved in either a horizontal or vertical fashion. With the horizontal option, each tile is stacked on top of the other horizontally to fill the space, and with the vertical option, the tile is stacked vertically. No matter the orientation, this option does a great job at adding a modern appeal to the bathroom. However, it tends to look best with tiles that are more rectangular in shape.

Freeform

If you have a tile that is abstract in shape or you want to make a bold accent with the tile, you may want to go with a freeform application. Just as it might sound, with freeform the installer will basically treat the application area much like a puzzle in that they will work to fit each piece of tile within the space, adjusting the size of each tile where necessary without much rhyme or reason. This option does provide a unique look, but it is harder to achieve and therefore takes longer.

Herringbone

If you want to create a more upgraded or luxurious look for your bathroom, consider a herringbone style. Herringbone is very similar to a chevron pattern; however, the peak points of the design usually have a more pointed arch, as the tiles are laid at a 45-degree angle. You can apply any tile with this lay pattern, but generally, it tends to look best with smaller, rectangular-shaped tiles. 

Modified Offset

The modified offset style is very similar to brick-lay, in that each row of the tiles is slightly offset from the previous. However, unlike brick-lay, the rows are not offset at the halfway line of the tile row before. Instead, the tiles are offset at varying degrees, such as at the 1/3 or 2/3 mark. If you want a more traditional style, but you also want to add a custom look, this is a great option. 

Remember, how you lay the tile in your bathroom will have a dramatic effect on the overall look of the space, so make sure you choose wisely. 


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